Sycamine tree

Sycamine tree
   Mentioned only in Luke 17:6. It is rendered by Luther "mulberry tree" (q.v.), which is most probably the correct rendering. It is found of two species, the black mulberry (Morus nigra) and the white mulberry (Mourea), which are common in Palestine. The silk-worm feeds on their leaves. The rearing of them is one of the chief industries of the peasantry of Lebanon and of other parts of the land. It is of the order of the fig-tree. Some contend, however, that this name denotes the sycamore-fig of Luke 19:4.

Easton's Bible Dictionary. . 1897.

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  • Sycamine tree — The Sycamine tree is mentioned only in Luke 17:6. It is rendered by Luther mulberry tree , which is most probably the correct rendering. It is found of two species, the black mulberry ( Morus nigra ) and the white mulberry ( Morus alba ), which… …   Wikipedia

  • sycamine — [sik′ə min, sik′əmīn΄] n. [L sycaminus < Gr sykaminos < Sem, as in Heb shikma, mulberry] a tree mentioned in the Bible (Luke 17:6), believed to be a mulberry (Morus nigra) with dark fruit …   English World dictionary

  • sycamine — n. Bibl. the black mulberry tree, Morus nigra (see Luke 17:6; in modern versions translated as mulberry tree ). Etymology: L sycaminus f. Gk sukaminos mulberry tree f. Heb. sikmah sycamore, assim. to Gk sukon fig …   Useful english dictionary

  • sycamine — noun Etymology: Latin sycaminus, from Greek sykaminos, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew shiqmāh mulberry tree, sycamore Date: 1526 a tree of the Bible that is usually considered a mulberry (Morus nigra) …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • sycamine — /sik euh min, muyn /, n. a tree mentioned in the New Testament, probably the black mulberry. [1520 30; < L sycaminus < Gk sykáminos < Sem; cf. Heb shiqmah mulberry tree, sycamore (Gk form with y influenced by sykon fig)] * * * …   Universalium

  • sycamine — noun A tree, mentioned in Lukes Gospel, and thought to be the black mulberry. The lorde sayde: yf ye had fayth lyke a grayne off mustard sede, and shulde saye unto thys sycamyne tree, plucke thysilfe uppe by the rotes, and plant thysilfe in the… …   Wiktionary

  • sycamine — syc•a•mine [[t]ˈsɪk ə mɪn, ˌmaɪn[/t]] n. pln bib a tree mentioned in the New Testament, probably the black mulberry Morus nigra[/ex] • Etymology: 1520–30; < L sȳcamīnus « Semitic; cf. Heb shiqmāh mulberry tree, sycamore …   From formal English to slang

  • sycamine — /ˈsɪkəmaɪn/ (say sikuhmuyn) noun a mulberry (tree), probably the black mulberry. {Latin sȳcamīnus, from Greek sȳkamīnos, from Aramaic shiqmīn plural). See Luke 17.6} …  

  • Mulberry —    Heb. bakah, to weep; rendered Baca (R.V., weeping ) in Ps. 84:6. The plural form of the Hebrew bekaim is rendered mulberry trees in 2 Sam. 5:23, 24 and 1 Chr. 14:14, 15. The tree here alluded to was probably the aspen or trembling poplar. We… …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • Luke 17 — 1 Then said he unto the disciples, It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe unto him, through whom they come! 2 It were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he cast into the sea, than that he should offend… …   The King James version of the Bible

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